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Monica_55905 Jul 19

A JUST TRANSITION HAS TO INCLUDE THE GENDER AGENDA

A JUST TRANSITION HAS TO INCLUDE THE GENDER AGENDA image
THE 2030 AGENDA SHOWS THE COMMITMENT OF COUNTRIES TO ENVIRONMENTAL, SOCIAL, GOVERNANCE AND ECONOMIC OBJECTIVES THAT CONVERGE IN A SYSTEMIC AND INTEGRATED WAY AND THAT NECESSARILY REQUIRE A DECENT WORK MODEL TO MAKE IT A REALITY.
Decent work is the starting point and the key element so that we can talk about a triple impact economy, a model of sustainable development and green jobs. It is useless to reduce environmental impacts if you live in a society that cannot guarantee decent working conditions, formality and inclusion.

In this sense, systemic and transversal, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development makes it clear that inclusion and equal rights without distinction of gender cut across all of its objectives; including, of course, SDG 8 on decent work, which commits countries to achieve full productive employment for all women and men and equal pay for work of equal value.

However, as we all know, despite the strenuous efforts of many, the gaps and inequalities continue to exist. In the field of economic autonomy, this is crystal clear whether one analyzes opportunities for participation in the market, such as access to work and, of course, wage gaps. It is true that these differences come for decades and remain, but it is also true that they have grown during the Covid 19 pandemic.

This is undoubtedly due to multiple reasons that range from the increase in unpaid care tasks to the greater labor informality in which women tend to work and the high rate of economic vulnerability that affects them.

If the proposed objective is to work to promote the generation of green employment; manage in innovative ways; rethinking the way of "doing" and projecting a transition path that leaves no one behind, the gender agenda must be present, to make this new model of labor development a more equitable reality.

It is interesting to understand that the existing gaps not only affect rights protected by all regulatory frameworks; rather, they also imply wasting the enormous contribution that women could make to the sustainable development of their communities. When climate change policies are discussed, for example, it is recognized that women are the ones who are most affected by its effects, and not only are they victims, but they are also active agents of change with knowledge and mitigation skills acquired over years in care activities.

That is to say, they have expert and differentiated knowledge, however, and although the outlook has changed in recent years, the participation of women in decision-making related to climate change is still scarce. The so-called “just transition” should then include women and those who remain excluded from economic activity and/or in disadvantaged conditions due to gender issues, not only as relevant points on the agendas but with active participation in the decision-making.

The transformation process towards a more sustainable economy requires generating policies, incentives, dialogue and collaboration. But it is essential that this transformative process, this transition, is also fair and this implies that it is inclusive, leaving no one behind. A more sustainable future requires an efficient, transparent production system that does not harm the environment and is competitive, but for this - it must not be forgotten - it must be inclusive.

By Marisa Siboldi - Consultant in Sustainable Development and Supply Chains, originally published in the magazine Gerencia Ambiental, Media Partners of EnergyNet.